The “Pinocchio Project” offers technology support to Piedmont’s hospital teachers and their students, for a more flexible and engaging didactics.

Since 2014, DiaSorin has invested - along with Rotary, Rotaract and Turin Inner Wheel - in the “Pinocchio Project”, which is activated in 3 Piedmont hospital sections to support the over 3,000 children admitted each year in their education and search of normality. One of the key actions of this initiative is providing the active teachers in the facilities and their students with 60 tablets, with the aim of making teaching more flexible and engaging. These devices are extremely close to the needs of the pupils in the hospital: they reduce the need for stationery, they don’t need plugs and cables, they are very versatile (from a blackboard to sketching albums with the touch of a finger), they offer endless interactions to learn while having fun and allow the kids to have all the books of different subjects into a single, handy tool. They also allow teenagers to always stay connected with their friends, effectively improving the quality of their lives during the therapies.

The innovative methodologies used by teachers in clinics are effective not only from the point of view of learning, but also to repair the student's emotional mood, sickened by the disease.

Tiziana Catenazzo, School Director of the Peyron Institute of Turin and the Regional Pole for Hospital Sections

"The students involved talk about an easier school," says Professor Catenazzo. An important fact, that DiaSorin considers the basis on which to continue building and investing.

DiaSorin has provided the active teachers in the facilities and their students with 60 tablets, with the aim of making teaching more flexible and engaging for the little patients.

“The school in the hospital ward is very important because it allows the kids to get into a dimension of normality and projection," explains Elena Rainò, Infantile Neuropsychiatrist and Medical Manager at the Regina Margherita Hospital in Turin. “It's a bridge that allows them not to be excluded from the program and the activities carried out in their schools,” says Maria Alberti, coaching teacher, “because” she continues “they are just passers-by in the hospital.